• 25 June 2019
  • 1 min read

Sperm frozen long-term makes no difference to birth rates

  • Nurses.co.uk News
    Editorial and news team

Long-term sperm freezing makes no difference to live birth rates, a study has found.

The study found that the frozen sperm’s survival rate after thawing did decline over the 15-year study period

Despite a time limit imposed in many countries on the freeze-storage of sperm, a large sperm bank study has shown the long-term cryopreservation of semen in a sperm bank does not affect future clinical outcomes.

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The findings are based on a retrospective analysis of 119,558 semen samples from donors at the Hunan Sperm Bank in China.

The samples were arranged in three groups: those kept in cryostorage for between six months and five years, those stored for between six and 10 years, and those stored for between 11 and 15 years.

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The study first found that the frozen sperm’s survival rate after thawing did decline over the 15-year study period – from 85% to 74% survival.

However, this decline made little difference to the pregnancy and live birth rate in women using these samples for donor insemination, with cumulative live birth rates of 82.17%, 80.21% and 80.00% in the three storage groups respectively.

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Success rates were similarly comparable when the frozen sperm samples were used in IVF, with live birth rates of 81.63%, 79.11% and 73.91% in the three groups.

Results of the study are being presented at the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (Eshre) annual meeting in Vienna.