• 20 January 2021
  • 5 min read

Registered Managers: How Much You Can Expect To Be Paid Working In Care Homes

  • Mat Martin
    Content Manager
    • Mat Martin
    • Aubrey Hollebon
    • Richard Gill
  • 0
  • 1186
"On average, registered managers earn between £35,000 and £40,000 a year."

We outline what you can earn as a Registered Manager working in Social Care, in both NHS and private care homes, as well as the future for Registered Manager pay.

Topics covered in this article

Introduction

What Is The Average Salary For A Registered Manager?

Is There A Big Difference Between Pay In The NHS And Privately?

How Do You Increase Your Salary And Develop Your Career As A Registered Manager?

What’s Next For Registered Manager Pay?

Looking For Your Next Registered Manager Role?

Introduction

Registered managers are often known as Home Managers, Care Home Managers or Registered Home Managers.

But in almost every case, you’re dealing with exactly the same role.

Regulated by the Care Quality Commission (CQC), Registered Managers are responsible for the finances, staffing, health and safety, and general management of a care home.

Registered Managers work in care homes in the public and private sectors – although the vast majority of care homes are now operated privately.

Here’s a brief guide to how much you can expect to earn as a Registered Manager, and other factors you should consider in terms of pay.

What Is The Average Salary For A Registered Manager?

On average, registered managers earn between £35,000 and £40,000 a year.

However, this should only be seen as a rough guide.

Newer and less experienced Registered Managers might earn closer to £25,000 a year, while highly experienced and specialised Registered Managers can earn in excess of £60,000 a year.

Your salary will also depend on a number of factors like the size and scope of the home, its location, and the types of residents you support.

Is There A Big Difference Between Pay In The NHS And Privately?

In the NHS, Registered Manager salaries are controlled like any other – under a banding system.

Typically, Registered Managers are paid a Band 6 salary.

A Band 6 salary starts at £31,365 a year, and through incremental rises can increase to £37,890.

For more specialist roles or experienced candidates, Band 7 salaries are also possible, which start at £38,890 and rise to a maximum of £44,503.

In the private sector, which manages 84% of homes, average salaries are similar.

However, it’s probably fair to say that with enough experience it’s easier to earn a higher salary privately.

How Do You Increase Your Salary And Develop Your Career As A Registered Manager?

Boosting your pay packet will primarily come from boosting your CV.

Whatever point you’re at in your career, there are always courses available to improve your skills – and the best place to start is the sector’s workforce development agency Skills for Care.

While it isn’t always necessary for getting a job as a Registered Manager, aiming for an NVQ4 in Leadership and Management in Care Services will put you in an excellent position to command a higher salary.

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And gaining experience within different settings and building up your network of contacts will also improve your chances of negotiating a better wage.

Despite there being around 23,000 Registered Managers in the UK, the most qualified are always in high demand.

Registered Managers can also become more specialised, working within homes that cater for very specific conditions.

It’s also possible to become a Regional Manager, perhaps taking leadership for a number of homes in a geographical area.

Other Registered Managers do sometimes become consultants for the industry, or specialist care home inspectors.

What’s Next For Registered Manager Pay?

Care homes and the salaries paid to staff have been in the spotlight for some time.

An ageing population coupled with consistent recruitment problems has meant that services have often been overstretched.

The COVID-19 pandemic has made those challenges even worse, and the efforts of all staff in the sector have been nothing short of heroic.

As a result, campaigners, politicians and the general public are all coming out in support for better pay.

In fairness, much of the focus is on staff at the lower end of care homes, such as Care Assistants, whose hourly rates of pay remain stubbornly low despite the sacrifices they’ve made.

But the enormous pressure facing Registered Managers hasn’t gone unnoticed either.

As yet no across-the-board increases have been agreed, but all eyes are on the government’s next move.

Looking For A Home Manager Role?

Whether you’re looking for your first Registered Manager position or a change of role, register with us today and we can send you a selection of the very latest roles.

Let me know in the comments your thoughts on Registered Manager Pay and what I've said above - let's chat there!

Oh, and please Like this article to let me know you enjoyed it - thank you!

About the author

  • Mat Martin
    Content Manager

I have a background in visual media and film content. I'm now developing other content delivery skills, and am enjoying talking to people in health and social care who want to contribute and feel passionate about what they do. I’m constantly struck by the quality and feeling in the articles we receive from them, and I aim to ensure the readers are too.

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  • Mat Martin
    Content Manager

About the author

  • Mat Martin
    Content Manager

I have a background in visual media and film content. I'm now developing other content delivery skills, and am enjoying talking to people in health and social care who want to contribute and feel passionate about what they do. I’m constantly struck by the quality and feeling in the articles we receive from them, and I aim to ensure the readers are too.

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