• 03 May 2018
  • 6 min read

Get Ready For Google - The Good, The Bad and The Ugly of online job posting

  • Matt Farrah
    Nurses.co.uk Co-Founder

One thing that Google For Jobs will do is improve the quality of job advertising. In this blog I'll outline what Google For Jobs means for recruiters.

Clint recommends completeness

One thing that Google For Jobs will do is improve the quality of job advertising.

Google For Jobs is going to make sure hiring organisations post jobs that tell jobseekers all the information they need to know before they click Apply.

In short, Google will persuade you to post complete and unique jobs.

In this blog I'm going to explain what Complete means and what Unique means.

If you follow these simple guidelines you will get more views and applications for your jobs.

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Get More Views and Applications - Be Good

We frequently get asked by recruiters how they can get more applications.

Simple, we say - just post excellent job ads.

That means complete and unique.

In this blog we'll explain how adding a location, salary, detail, and a good description can make the difference between a Good job ad or a Bad job ad or an Ugly job ad.

And we'll explain why you need to be like Clint if you want your jobs to get exposure beyond our site, including a Google search.

Why Is This Suddenly So Important?

Google For Jobs.

That's why you need to understand completeness and uniqueness.

If you don't yet know what Google For Jobs is, read this blog about it and then come back.

The importance of posting a unique job ad with clear, specific information is not a new concept.

Google haven't just hit upon a revelation.

Visibility and application rates for well posted jobs have always been greater. It's like this:

We've been trying to coerce good job posting for many years.

Some recruiters post good jobs.

Some don't.

Since we launched in 2009 we've explained that poorly posted jobs get less visibility.

However, some recruiters feel that it's in their best interest to post jobs...

• without accurate locations

• no salaries

• indeterminate job titles

• that use keyword stuffing

That's fine.

There are reasons that make it valid for them to do so.

    Read more

    • What is Google for Jobs?

    • Recruiting in health and social care? Find out about advertising on this site, plus tips, advice and news

For instance, competing agencies may be able to tell, from these details, who your clients are and seek to poach them.

So, the decision is this: do you want applications for your jobs, or do you want to keep your client list confidential.

That's up to you.

But it's our duty to explain how to improve your chances of getting applications.

And, with the arrival of Google For Jobs, the disadvantage of continuing with a strategy of posting poor job ads will become more evident.

Google is about to use the biggest carrot available to encourage everyone to up their quality game.

Google's carrot is even bigger than this one

You need to be aware that incomplete jobs won't have much visibility beyond the site you post to.

Such jobs are unlikely to appear in any of our paid traffic marketing (nothing new there), or our social marketing (nothing new there), or Google

... and because everyone 'gets' Google it means we will have a lightbulb moment.

Post good quality jobs and they will be marketed more

The Good, The Bad and The Ugly - completeness

Let's imagine that there's one job.

I've posted it in three different ways. One way (The Good) meets all the criteria. We're sure Google For Jobs would love this example and so will candidates.

I'll highlight what it does well.

I'll explain why the other two versions don't pass muster.

The Bad and The Ugly jobs will have little-to-no visibility beyond our site and may attract less interest from good candidates.

We see examples of all three on our sites.

I've imagined a nursing job at a fictional hospital in London.

And I've posted three versions of job ads for it.

One is Good. One is Bad. One is Ugly.

Hopefully you can tell which one is which:

The same job, posted in three different ways

Let's look at the key elements done well in the best job ad.

Advanced Nurse Endoscopist Band 8A

- Very specific job title. Google and users love specific. Do it. Nursing is a HIGHLY SPECIALISED vocation. Get the specialism in the job title.

- Very specific location. Jobseekers need this to know where they're going to work!

 - Salary. People work for money. So tell them about the money. Google For Jobs, job boards and everyone values critical data like this. Get your job found by providing rich and specific information.

- Job description. This Job Description is detailed and it's descriptive not prescriptive (it sells and describes the job, it doesn't simply dictate a series of demands the applicant must fulfil). It explains the benefits. It is long enough but not too long. It is clearly written by someone who really understands the role and loves the industry.

What to avoid

We suggest you avoid:

- Hyperbole

- Generalisms

- Sales

- Entering contact details (you want to track this)

- Keyword stuffing (it has zero benefit and looks awful to humans and search bots)

- Repetition (it also has zero benefit and looks awful to humans and search bots)

Our understanding of what it is looking for means Google will shoot this down. And so will all other traffic vendors. Little visibility in the outside world.

Uniqueness

No one likes clones

Finally, uniqueness. Avoid cloning.

Again, look, we really do understand and sympathise.

Recruitment is competitive, time is short, and you have a million things to do before the end of the day.

So copy and pasting jobs seems like a necessity.

And while you're at it, just stick all the requirements you might ever have in there: all branches of nursing in one job title.

Unfortunately, this isn't a job description.

Recruiting in health and social care?

Find out how Nurses.co.uk can help your recruitment business or hiring campaigns

Find out more

So it doesn't increase your chances of being visible or receiving applications. It does the opposite: it diminishes them.

Also, there's a branding issue here.

Look again at the image (above) to see what it looks like to visitors. Is this how you want them to view your organisation?

We can't be 100% sure, but considering how much work Google's search algorithms put in to eliminating duplication, we imagine Google For Jobs will promote jobs that are unique and suppress those that are repeated.

Please do try to make your jobs stand out by writing real job descriptions clearly and in detail, about each unique role you wish to fill.

Good luck and get in touch with any questions.

Send me comments and thoughts

About the author

  • Matt Farrah
    Nurses.co.uk Co-Founder

I studied English before moving into publishing in the mid 90s. I co-founded Nurses.co.uk in 2008. I’m interested in providing a platform that gives a voice to nurses and those working in care and nursing. I'm fascinated by the career choices we make. In the case of those working in care I've discovered that there's a positive, life-affirming common theme: they do it for love not money.

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  • Matt Farrah
    Nurses.co.uk Co-Founder

About the author

  • Matt Farrah
    Nurses.co.uk Co-Founder

I studied English before moving into publishing in the mid 90s. I co-founded Nurses.co.uk in 2008. I’m interested in providing a platform that gives a voice to nurses and those working in care and nursing. I'm fascinated by the career choices we make. In the case of those working in care I've discovered that there's a positive, life-affirming common theme: they do it for love not money.