• 16 January 2018
  • 2 min read

Choosing between a Learning Disability Nursing job offer from the NHS against the private sector

  • Lauren Young
    RNLD (Learning Disability Nurse)

Weighing up the advantages of both jobs, RNLD Lauren Young explains her dilemma when deciding if she should work for the NHS or for the private sector.

Sometimes, your dream job isn't what you thought it would be.

Sadly, this was the case for me.

I resigned from my job for various reasons, but due to a favourable job market, I've received two job offers.

Job one: NHS

One offer is for a unit in the NHS.

The NHS is often seen as the Holy Grail for nurses, and other healthcare staff.

As well as being the most well-known, it offers benefits such as a good pension, a staff discount card, and an excellent training scheme.

The specific job I have been offered is working in a short-stay and respite unit for people with neurological disorders.

This is just one example of the myriad of people and environments who could benefit from, and see the advantages of having learning disability nurses.

This role would really expand my clinical skills, doing daily observations, as well as medications and daily notes.

I would gain knowledge about the various neurological disorders; slightly different from people who have learning disabilities.

It would also push me out of my comfort zone, into a new area of care within a busy ward.

Job two: private sector

In contrast, the second offer is in a care home, specifically for people who have learning disabilities.

I have experience in this area, having worked in care homes on placement before starting the course at university.

It is my area of interest and expertise.

However, it is a private company so the pension may not be as good.

We discussed training at the interview and when I visited, I asked about a preceptorship.

Preceptorships vary so widely that I really wanted to know how much support I would have.

The manager indicated I could have a bespoke preceptorship, both to me and the company.

We talked about shadowing first so I could learn more about the residents and the care home.

My title would officially be Assistant Manager (as well as nurse), which I suppose is normal within care homes, but it does make the whole thing more real to me, especially the level of responsibility I will be expected to hold.

So this is my dilemma.

Both jobs are very tempting. They're both very different but would offer me multiple opportunities and a wealth of experience.

Now all I need to do is make my final decision!

About the author

  • Lauren Young
    RNLD (Learning Disability Nurse)

I am a qualified Learning Disability Nurse and Social Worker. I first worked with children who have learning disabilities whilst studying classical civilisation in Leeds. After seven years of working in care, I realised I wanted to take my passion further and qualify at a professional level. I am passionate about giving the people I work with, as much independence as possible.

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  • Lauren Young
    RNLD (Learning Disability Nurse)

About the author

  • Lauren Young
    RNLD (Learning Disability Nurse)

I am a qualified Learning Disability Nurse and Social Worker. I first worked with children who have learning disabilities whilst studying classical civilisation in Leeds. After seven years of working in care, I realised I wanted to take my passion further and qualify at a professional level. I am passionate about giving the people I work with, as much independence as possible.