• 07 August 2021
  • 3 min read

What Band 5 Salary Nurses Get Paid In 2022 – And What You’ll Do To Earn It

  • Matt Farrah
    CEO & Co-Founder
    • Bala Nataraj
  • 2
  • 123649
A quick guide to what a Band 5 position will now pay – and what you will be required to do to earn that salary

The New Pay Deal for the NHS was signed in 2018 and ensured a minimum pay increase for all nurses at all bandings over the subsequent three years. Here’s what it means for Band 5 nurses.

Comments

See the end of the article for response and comments

Your new pay packet

Here we briefly examine what you’ll currently earn in an NHS Band 5 position – and what you will be required to do to earn that salary.

(Figures include the 3% pay rise implemented in July 2021, back-dated to April 2021.)

Entry level Nurses currently earn £25,655 with 1-2 years’ experience, while those with 2-4 years’ experience will earn £27,780 a year.

Beyond this, and for any other banding or level of experience, you can find out exactly what you’ll be paid by using our handy Nursing Pay Scale And Bands pay table and our NHS Take Home Pay Calculator.

The highest possible annual salary within this banding currently will be £31,534 once you have over 4 years experience.

Your duties at Band 5

For a Band 5 general nursing position, first and foremost you’ll need to be NMC registered, which will require you to have a nursing degree.

Within the job, you’ll often be the first point of contact for a patient, and you’ll normally work within a multi-disciplinary team.

Whether dealing with minor injuries or people with chronic health issues, you’ll help to provide assessments of the patient, evaluate their needs and plan their ongoing journey in your care setting – and beyond.

On any given day, you could be expected to:

• Write patient care plans

• Monitor pulse, blood pressure and temperature

• Observe and record the condition of patients

• Check and administer drugs and injections

• Set up drips and blood transfusions

• Assist with tests and evaluations

• Plan discharges from hospitals

• Communicate with families and friends of patients

This is just a broad guide, as the responsibilities you’ll have could vary greatly according to the specialist area you work in, and whether you’re hospital or community based.

Typically, you’ll be expected to work in a shift pattern that can include evenings, weekends and nights.

But community roles could afford you a more structured, 9-5 role.

Find your next Band 5 position today

Whether you’re newly qualified or looking for new experience, we have roles to suit every nurse at every stage of their career.

Comments

From Theresa, by email

"I would like to point out that for specialist staff nurses band 6 who are the most important team in specialist area of a hospital an ITU requires 65% of Staff Nurses to be Band 6 to meet standards of care, this group of Staff Specialised Nurses have been capped at a very low rate.

"I have been a specialist Nurse in ITU / CCU both Adult & Paediatric for more than 8 yrs, I have been a Nurse for more than 25 yrs, have been a band 7 for 4 yrs but due to change of location had to take a band 6.

"It is not possible to simply say you need to climb through the bands to earn a better salary.

"I believe this article needs to also look at the requirements of any NHS Trust. There is a limited # of Band 7 positions and Band 8 - its the Christmas tree scenario / effect.

"So I believe that Band 6 Specialist Nurses should have more pay scale as some work in ITU / CCU / NICU, A&E, Theatres / Recovery.

"The list is ongoing - more investment in these area of Band 6 specialist nurses is required as they fall into the same category as Band 6 on a General Ward with no post graduate courses or experience."

About the author

  • Matt Farrah
    CEO & Co-Founder

I studied English before moving into publishing in the mid 90s. I co-founded Nurses.co.uk and our other three sites in 2008. I wanted to provide a platform that gives a voice to those working in health and social care. I'm fascinated, generally, by the career choices we all make. But I'm especially interested in the stories told by those who choose to spend their life supporting others. They are mostly positive and life-affirming stories, despite the considerable challenges and burdens faced.

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  • Matt Farrah
    CEO & Co-Founder

About the author

  • Matt Farrah
    CEO & Co-Founder

I studied English before moving into publishing in the mid 90s. I co-founded Nurses.co.uk and our other three sites in 2008. I wanted to provide a platform that gives a voice to those working in health and social care. I'm fascinated, generally, by the career choices we all make. But I'm especially interested in the stories told by those who choose to spend their life supporting others. They are mostly positive and life-affirming stories, despite the considerable challenges and burdens faced.

  • 2 Comments
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    • Matt Farrah one year ago
      Matt Farrah
    • Matt Farrah
      one year ago

      Here's a fuller reply to Michelle's question from a nursing colleague that I spoke to about this: "Oh god... that ... read more

    • Michelle Bolt one year ago
      Michelle Bolt
    • Michelle Bolt
      one year ago

      Does anybody know if a newly qualified band 5 of 6 months should be in charge of a ward. If ... read more

      • Are you speaking from experience here Michelle? It seems very soon. Pay is determined by Band and years exp. Usually progression so soon to Band 6, without specialising or further training, would be u... read more

        Are you speaking from experience here Michelle? It seems very soon. Pay is determined by Band and years exp. Usually progression so soon to Band 6, without specialising or further training, would be unusual. I'd be interested to know if you have been put in charge of a ward?
        read less

        Replied by: Matt Farrah